The Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the V…



The Great Stink of London In the sweltering summer of 1858, the stink of sewage from the polluted Thames was so offensive that it drove Members of Parliament from the chamber of the House of Commons. The engineer entrusted by Parliament with this enormous task was Sir Joseph Bazalgette. This book presents an account of his life and work. Full descriptionPublished by Alan Sutton

1: Origami 6: I. Mathematics



A unique collection of papers illustrating the connections between origami and a wide range of fields. The papers compiled in this two-part set were presented at the 6th International Meeting on Origami in Science, Mathematics and Education (10-13 August 2014, Tokyo, Japan). They display the creative melding of origami (or, more broadly, folding) with fields ranging from cell biology to space exploration, from education to kinematics, from abstract mathematical laws to the artistic and…

Almost Gone: Twenty-Five Days and One Chance to Save Our Daughter



This is the never-before-told, riveting true story about a teenage Christian girl who was seduced online by a charming young Muslim man from Kosovo, and her father who ultimately worked with the FBI to save her from disappearing forever.

The Baldwins were a strong Christian family, living in Plano, Texas. When their seventeen-year-old daughter, Mackenzie, met Aadam in a random-match online chat room, she fell for his good looks, his charm, and his respectful conversation. He told her he lived…

The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story: How Some Man You’ve Never Heard …



Michael Lewis was supposed to be writing about how Jim Clark, the founder of Silicon Graphics and Netscape, was going to turn health care on its ear by launching Healtheon, which would bring the vast majority of the industry’s transactions online. So why was he spending so much time on a computerised yacht, each feature installed because, as one technician put it, “someone saw it on Star Trek and wanted one just like it?”

Much of The New New Thing, to be fair, is devoted to the Healtheon…

The Last Volcano: A Man, a Romance, and the Quest to Understand Nature’s Mo…



Volcanoes have fascinated-and terrified-people for ages. They have destroyed cities and ended civilizations. John Dvorak, the acclaimed author of Earthquake Storms, looks into the early scientific study of volcanoes and the life of the man who pioneered the field, Thomas Jaggar. Educated at Harvard, Jaggar went to the Caribbean after Mount Pelee exploded in 1902, killing more than 26,000 people. Witnessing the destruction and learning about the horrible deaths these people had suffered,…

The Dirty Chef: From big city food critic to foodie farmer



From an often controversial job as one of Australia’s most powerful food critics, Matthew Evans stepped, unknowing and untested, off the treadmill. Leaving the urban grit of a terrace house in Sydney’s inner west, he ended up on 20 acres in Australia’s most southernmost shire; a smallholder farmer in Tasmania with no clue. What is it really like to take the plunge and leave a whole world of familiar people, places and work behind? How does it feel to have never used a cordless drill, to…

Michael Faraday: A Life From Beginning to End


Michael Faraday

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Michael Faraday is regarded as one of the founding fathers of modern physics. His work in the field of electromagnetism revolutionized society, leading to new avenues of study and developments of technology that would leave the world changed forever. Without Faraday’s discoveries, there would be no electronics or electrical power. There…

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